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Adopt a Pet

A Cat Harness And Leash – Exercise And Fresh Air For Your Cat

These day it is not at all unusual to see folks out walking their feline companion using a cat harness and leash.

Many of us keep our cats indoors for many reasons. One drawback is that our cats may not be getting sufficient exercise.

Of course playing with your cat helps keep her in trim, as does cat equipment such as kitty condos or climbers. But a regular walk about may be just the thing for keeping your indoor feline in tip top shape. A cat harness and leash is essential for accomplishing this safely.

If your cat has never been walked on a leash before then she is going to need training and it will take quite some patience.

You cannot take a trip to the pet store, select a leash and harness, and be out walking your cat the same day. It is going to take time for your cat to be comfortable with the idea of wearing a harness, let alone being restricted by a leash.

Please, understand that cats should never be walked with a leash attached to a collar. Cats are not built the same way as dogs, their necks are not as sturdy. A leash attached to a collar would put a strain on your cat’s neck when she resists the pull, a harness is essential.

The first thing is to get your cat to wear the strange looking contraption. This can only be done with gentle loving persuasion. A good tip is to just leave the harness on the floor for a few days, let your cat sniff at it and get used to it as an object.

Next, attempt to get kitty into the harness, all the time talking to her soothingly. Yes, it is likely she will resist, wriggle and fuss, maybe even attempt to scratch. Don’t force the issue, let her be and try again later.

When your patience has triumphed and your cat is harnessed, give her a lot of praise. If she accepts wearing it all well and good, keep her in it for no longer than ten minutes, but it is more likely she will protest and if she does let her wear it for a few moments, then release her before she gets stressed. Again giving plenty of praise.

Repeat this routine until your cat is quite comfortable walking around wearing her harness indoors.

Now is the time to attach the leash, but don’t try to walk her yet even indoors. Let her drag the lead around, watch that it does not snag on anything. The idea is to get your her used to the idea that a cat harness and leash go together.

When your cat is happy with wearing both leash and harness, pick up the handle of the leash. Follow your cat, don’t try to get her to follow you just yet. Should your pet sit down, pull at the lead or stop, then don’t pull, keep the leash slack and use enticing words to try and persuade her to move.

After several sessions, you may be able to congratulate yourself that you’ve trained your little pet to walk around indoors wearing her cat harness and leash, well done.

Now for the outdoors.

Make it a very short walk out at first, and pick a quiet time. Most probably kitty will not be much interested in walking at first, too many new smells to check out.

Don’t try five mile hikes, she is only a cat, investigate where she wants to with you in control to keep her out of trouble. Your feline friend will get great benefit from her little walks on a cat harness and leash, a little exercise, fresh air and some relief from being indoors.…

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General Articles

6 Must Know Tips Before Getting A Kitten

6 Must Know Tips Before Getting A Kitten

Getting a kitten can be one of the most wonderful experiences in a person’s life. For anyone wishing to bring home a kitten for the first time, there are lots of important points that have to be noted by the members of his or her household. Since it is a huge step to bring a pet home, it is always a good idea to make sure that you can take proper care of it and are prepared to invest time in mingling with the new pet to know about its behavior, likes and dislikes, and don’t mind spending time in training it.

Before getting a kitten, the members of your household should make sure that their house has been made suitable for the cat. All dangerous items such as pesticides, insect killing sprays, and sharp items should be moved out of the range of the kitten. A kitten is just like an infant baby, unaware of the items inside a home that can prove to be dangerous for its health.

To prepare for your new pet and in order to make her feel comfortable, a few treats such as cat condos, cat food, and a cat carrier should be purchased before the kitten is brought home.

One vital tip that potential kitten owners have to keep in their mind is that their feeding dish should always be kept clean. If you notice that your kitty is not consuming her food that was kept in the dish, the food should immediately be disposed off and the dish be cleaned properly.

Kittens often love to sleep on carpets as it gives them a warm and soft feeling. For this reason, they should be kept as clean as possible and vacuumed regularly so that parasites do not trouble your delicate new friend.

Cleaning the litter tray of kittens is equally important and should be done on a regular basis. If their litter tray is not cleaned regularly, kittens would usually get into the habit of making other corners of your home dirty. Try sprinkling baking soda on the tray to avoid bad smells coming from it.

Before getting a kitten, it is always advisable that her new owners are aware of the type of food that kittens usually consume. If your kitty is exposed to food of new brands, there is a chance that her delicate stomach may get into trouble.

Bringing home a new pet is a great responsibility and we hope that you will bear these tips in mind before getting a kitten.…

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Pet Rescue

On Safari in Tarangire National Park, Tanzania

I have recently returned from a safari around some of the greatest National Parks and Reserves in the beautiful country of Tanzania. To give you an idea of the kind of animals and scenes I saw in one of my favourite parks there, Tarangire, I have put together a short diary of my day there.
We started our game drive nice and early and proceeded to Tarangire National Park. Spirits were high in our vehicle and we were hopeful to see some great wildlife during our time on safari. Almost instantaneously of arriving within the parks boundaries, we had spotted Zebra and even a herd of elephants taking shelter from the sun under a large Acacia tree. The elephants seemed to be using the tree to scratch themselves, and it was quite interesting to watch.
After a stop to observe the animals and take photographs, we drove on to see a few species of bird of prey, Griffon vultures – which were in a group of around 8 in a dead looking tree (it brought back scenes from the Disney film The Jungle Book!) and a Verreaux’s eagle, which was perched in a tree and later we saw it soaring above the land.
After a quick stop for lunch, we headed down towards a large watering hole, and what we saw next was unbelievable – a pride of lions spread out all around the watering hole, camouflaged into their surroundings and sheltering under trees – all of them had bloody paws, and the evidence of a couple of zebra kills was there in front of us in all its glory details.
There were also a herd of elephants at the watering hole which were having a mud bath and taking turns to throw their baby elephant into the large pool of mud, this was one of the funniest sights I have ever seen, and makes you realise how close elephants are.
Moving on from the watering hole, it was getting late, so was time for us to make moves out of the park. On our way back, we noticed a large crowd of cars pulled up alongside an Acacia tree, we stopped to get a closer look at what was demanding all this attention, and then we saw it – a leopard! The great spotted feline was asleep in the tree, just metres from where we were stopped. After a few minutes it stood up, turned around… and then went back to sleep facing the opposite direction!
On our long drive back to the main gate of the park, we saw plenty more animals, including giraffe, waterbuck and even a pair of Masai ostrich!…

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General Articles

Get to Know All About Ferret Life Span

Get to Know All About Ferret Life Span

Pet lovers and prospective ferret owners very frequently express their concerns centering round the life span of their beloved little fluffy pets. Precisely, the standard ferret life span stretches from six to eight years, but this again depends on the health conditions of the creature and their vulnerability to illness.

Typically, ferrets are very much prone to illness, and ferret syndromes are known to spread fast if not taken care of in the initial stages, thus minimizing their life span. Working towards increasing the lifespan of your ferret is equivalent to having the best diets and provisions for your pet. The better the diet and the more the attention and level of affection you provide, the longer can ferrets be expected to live.

Truth to be told, in spite of braining in the best diet and provisions for your pet ferrets, these little creatures do often fall prey to several medical complications and health conditions thus preventing them from living a longer life, and as such it is quite natural for ferret owners to express their interest in knowing every minute detail related to ferret care which in turn will increase the life span of their beloved pets. As responsible owners it falls within the purview of your responsibility to ensure that:

All vet care and vaccinations have been undergone as per schedule.

You understand their behavior well and try to observe if any kind of syndromes is present.

You give them the best food i.e. a diet rich in protein and fat, and the right care.

Ferret cages and other accessories are all appropriate. It is wise to keep your pets busy and ferret toys are the best alternatives.

The inquisitive and energetic nature of ferrets is not unknown to any of us. Curiosity comes naturally to these pets and they are not just energetic but mischievous creatures as well. As such it is up to you to ensure their health and safety. 6 – 8 years might be the typical determinants of a ferret life span, but this does in no way come in between the bond that you share with your pet!…

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Animal Shelter

Save Your Furniture Without Declawing Your Cat

Some people with indoor cats safeguard their furnishings by mutilating their beloved pets. It’s a fact, declawing is mutilation. Unlike a fingernail, a cat’s claws are attached right to the bone. When the claws are removed, the last bone and joint in every toe are also removed. Once you amputate your cat’s toes, you ruin its balance and agility. You alter the way your cat walks.

No one wants their furnishings wrecked by their cat, but there is another approach to cope with the dilemma. Think for a minute – why do cats scratch home furniture and climb draperies in the first place? It is because cats retain some of the instinctual behaviors they employed when they were wild animals. Cats that reside out doors climb rocks and trees and scratch the bark. That is natural behavior for cats. Cats don’t claw furnishings because they are nasty, they do it simply because they are cats.

The very best technique to prevent Fluffy or Bosco from ruining your Chippendale is to offer an alternative , a cat tree with an integrated scratching post. A very good cat tree will be sturdy and tall enough to simulate the experience of climbing a genuine tree. It would have integrated hiding places and certainly ought to have a built in scratching area. Sisal rope wound around the “trunk” of your structure works really nicely even though other materials also work well.

It is ideal to get your kitty accustomed to utilizing a cat tree and scratching post while it’s young. It’s easier to do than to attempt to get an older cat to adjust its habits. In any case, offering a normal option for scratching and climbing will make both you and him happier. Don’t mutilate your little buddy for for your own convenience.…

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Dog Shelter

Fluffy Bedding is Dangerous to Small Animals

Fluffy Bedding is a cotton wool like material distributed as a nesting material for pocket pets. It comes in numerous colours and under various product names. It is sold as a harmless, cozy place for your pet to curl up and sleep, unfortunately it is not safe in the least.
Many deaths and injuries have been caused by this product. The material used does not breakdown if consumed, and it is very easy for your pet to become entangled in it. It may tighten around limbs, cutting off circulation. if the animal is not able to get his limb free, it can cause damage to the tissue causing the limb to swell up painfully. In a short amount of time the limb will turn black from tissue death potentially spreading infection throughout the body. In an attempt to escape from the pain, your pet may chew the limb off which could result in death from blood loss, shock or infection.
The bedding may also become wound around his neck strangling him. If your hamster delivers a litter in the fluffy bedding, it could result in the passing of the litter.
Hamsters have cheek pouches which they use to carry food and bedding to their nests. The bedding can become trapped in the pouch, causing an impacted pouch. An impacted pouch will frequently become infected making eating and drinking painful. Impacted pouches require a trip to the veterinarian for treatment which may include a surgical procedure.
If the animal swallows the bedding material it will not break up in his gastrointestinal tract and may cause an obstruction. This requires a surgical operation to correct, however, if not discovered soon enough it will result in death.
What can I use for safe bedding material?
A simple way to tell if the bedding/nesting material you are using is safe is to place some in water. If it breaks apart, the way bathroom tissue does, then it will also break down if consumed and is easy to tear should it become wrapped around your pet. As a matter of fact the most harmless, risk-free thing to use for nesting material is plain, unscented bathroom tissue. Your pet will have fun ripping it up, fluffing it and hauling it around the cage. It is warm and soft to sleep in and is also inexpensive and easy to obtain.…

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Adopt a Dog

Things To Consider When Purchasing A Dog Bed

We all want to pamper our loyal companions, and that’s why the dog bed has become such a popular piece of “furniture” in so many households around the world. Once upon a time, the dog bed may have been nothing more than an old blanket thrown over in the corner of a room or perhaps an old rug. Now, the dog bed has evolved and taken on shapes, sizes and styles that none of us would have imagined 20 years ago!

There is just a huge array of styles to fit the needs of both the dog and the master. There are dog couches, donut beds, orthopedic dog beds, U shaped beds, personalized beds, heated dog beds, designer beds and the traditional round, rectangle and oval dog beds. Each style typically comes in several different sizes for small to large dogs. I’m sure there are more styles available, but this gives you some idea of the options you have.

Along with “specialty styles” comes “special prices”. You can get a plain round bed at discount stores at a decent price, but a specialized bed at a pet store, isn’t going to be cheap. Expect that anything unique is going to start in the $60 range, and the sky is the limit from there.

So what is the benefit of having a bed for your dog? Bottom line is that most people simply want to give their special friend something nice to rest or sleep on. Asides from that, many people feel that training their dog to sleep on their own designated dog bed, will keep their dog off the “human bed” or other furniture in the house. It’s a way to give your dog their own special place, much like a dog crate. In fact, many people put their dog bed inside of a dog crate.

So you think a dog bed is a great idea, you’ve found one you like and you’re ready to make a purchase. Here’s something to keep in mind. Not all dogs think having their own bed is such a great idea. It’s conceivable that you’ll spend $100 or more on a fancy new dog bed, only to find that your pet won’t lay on it! Or worse yet, you buy the bed then come home one afternoon to find the bed torn to smithereens and scattered throughout your home or apartment! Yes sadly, these situations do happen and there is no refund on a ripped up bed.

In conclusion, the dog bed is a great gift for your companion and can be a good way to train your pet to sleep in a particular area of your home. They come in a wide variety of shapes & sizes to fit the needs of any dog. As these beds have become more popular, prices have increased as well. Some good deals can be found on plain beds at the discount stores, but when you start shopping for something unique you can expect to pay a premium price. Your dog will have no idea how much you paid for the bed, so don’t blame the dog if you come home and find your $150 bed torn to pieces and scattered throughout your home! Some dogs accept a bed and some just think it’s a toy you bought them to chew up.…