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Dog

Getting Your Cat Ready for a New Baby

Having a new baby join your home is a change for everyone there. It is no different for pets that you have. Indoor pets are, especially, affected by the new bundle of joy. They may see a new baby as an intruder to their territory. There are some things you can do to get your cat ready to share the home with a new child.

Before you begin your training make sure that your cat is healthy. A check-up with a veterinarian is a good idea if your pet hasn’t had one lately. A couple other basic things to do are to play sounds of a baby to let your pet get used to the sound of a newborn human and to let him or her explore the nursery. Don’t let the cat set up camp in the nursery, though. This will make the situation worse when the baby starts using the room and displaces the cat.

If the child isn’t born yet and the pregnant woman is the person that does most of the caring for the cat, the responsibilities should be shifted before delivery. Cleaning the litter box should have already been a duty given to someone else for health reasons. Feeding and playtime should also be taken over by someone else in the house. This will keep the cat from feeling as jealous of the baby taking all of the mother’s time after the child comes home.

Get your cat used to the sounds and smells that come with having a baby in the house. Set up the baby swing and let it swing empty. Put some baby powder on a couple blankets and play with some baby toys. Allow your pet to associate these sounds and smells with you or the other caregivers before the child is in the picture.

Crib covers are available to keep the cat from getting into the crib and thinking that is his or her new bed. These can be used after the child comes home, as well. Another idea is to replace the door on the nursery with a screen door. This will allow you to keep the cat from getting into the room but still allowing you to hear if the baby is awake or upset.…

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Dog

Animals in the Wild – Television Viewing at Its Finest

Some of TV’s finest moments come from performances that don’t involve trained actors. TV documentaries fascinate many people. News and information shows also serve to “entertain” those who thirst for knowledge.
Wacky programming that feature dysfunctional individuals with over-the-top problems help create an audience for people like Jerry Springer and Maury Povich. Their shows are far-out and, while the problems presented may be real, live audiences don’t share in the pain shown by invited guests. They often squeal with laughter at them.
However, there is a TV format that is worthy of respect and the time it takes to watch an entire show unfold. This format, generally presented by National Geographic, follows the daily lives of animals in the wild. This is truly fascinating TV – educational and very entertaining, absorbing and often exciting – words from an encyclopedia that come “thrillingly” to life.
I, for one, believe that TV that educates often does a better job of entertaining than TV that intends only to entertain. In other words, trailing “gorillas in the mist” is far more entertaining than today’s hottest half hour sitcom.
Others may disagree, but that is what I believe… and feel. Education is intoxicating. Education you can “see” is almost irresistible. I love it and I’m not alone. When you tune in to one of these shows and see close-up footage of lions in their natural habitat – resting during the day, hunting in the night – you wonder (at least I wonder) what the photographer had to endure to get the film footage. Surely, there was no 5-star hotel nearby.
Moreover, “getting the footage” had to be incredibly dangerous. Wild animals follow their instincts and that can turn a photographer who is not careful into prey. In fact, that happened several years ago to a “naturalist” who had dedicated his life to living part of each year in the habitat of grizzly bears.
His experiences lasted for thirteen years until a grizzly turned on him, attacked and killed him. It’s a dangerous life, but it must be a satisfying life, as well. The film footage of bears… lions… wildebeest… crocodiles… and so many other forms of wildlife make TV interesting, entertaining, educational and incredibly compelling. I love it.…

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Dog Adoption

African Grey Parrots And Stress

The grey parrots may have many behavioral problems and most of them are caused by the human?s lack of understanding that it is first of all a prey bird and has little to do with a life in captivity. Many people fail to understand that and won?t allow that bird to manifest like a bird.

The grey parrots are exotic birds and come from strange lands. As strange as we find those lands, the same is for the parrots. They are not accustomed with the habits, the language or any other form of communication. A person should accept the parrot because the parrot also tries to understand the human behavior and tries to understand and live in peace with the human being.

Grey parrots caught in the wild are not aggressive when they are in a pair or breeding. They feel fear, which is justified, when they feel the presence of a human being, but they don?t have violent reactions. Usually, they share food, they play and they interact in a non ? violent manner. Strangely, the grey parrots who act more violently while breeding or in pairs are the domestic ones.

The domestic grey parrots have a few reasons to become aggressive:

* They loose the respect and consideration for themselves when they are in captivity.

* They loose the desire to live safe.

* They are affected by human aggression because avian species knows that pain or aggression mean death. Those animals are not used to touches, pokes, pushes, chasing, shaking or striking. Those actions are frightening and dangerous for the parrots.

* Their self confidence, their trust and their comfort are shattered if they are intimidated. Standing over them, or staring at them may have a strong impact on the birds.

* A grey parrot will never trust a person who tries to dominate him or control small aspects of the nature.

* Just as any human being, a grey parrot won?t trust a person who uses sensory deprivation as a mean of punishment for misbehavior.

A comparison between a wild animal and a domestic one would fail from the beginning in every way especially when it comes to birds, which are usually predators. Genetic inheritance eradication would require thousands of generations of selective breeding to obtain a domestic bird like a grey parrot and it is not always possible.

A bird that becomes stressed will start self mutilating or biting or will develop phobias. There are many factors that could induce stress to a bird. When it comes to grey parrots, a person should know what actions stress the bird and try to avoid them in order to keep the trust of the pet.

The grey parrots are intelligent and sensitive birds and they have the tendency to find in the human caregiver the qualities of a teacher, parental figure and mentor. They get attached to their caregiver and expect to be treated with respect and compassion. This is a method that works as well for birds as it does for humans or dogs.…

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Dog Adoption

How to Train Your Dog to Walk on a Lead

There is nothing worse than grappling to control your dog as it pulls you along, it’s tongue to one side of it’s mouth as it pants and pulls on the neck muscles close to strangulation. No matter what command you shout, nothing seems to work, until now!
Straight from the off, you need to show your dog who is the boss. You are the master and it takes directions and guidance from you. Make dog pulling a thing of the past with these proven methods. It’s going to take a little patience and a strong mind from you. You are going to have to give some simple commands and do some positive actions which your dog may not appreciate at first, but it’s necessary for long term success.
Place the lead on the collar before you go outside. Never allow the dog to bite the lead. If yours does this then say a firm ‘no’ command. Hold the lead in your left hand and let the lead cross your body down to the dog which will be at your right side. Your right hand should also be holding the lead in a gentle grip. Your dogs position should be slightly behind the lead just enough so it can see it in the corner of it’s eye. The dogs position should always be slightly behind the lead.
Proceed to walk, if the dog pulls and it probably will because it’s excited. It does not know where it’s going, it just wants to get there as fast as it can. When it starts to get ahead of the lead which you are holding across your body then stop quickly. Tell your dog to ‘heel’ and to position itself next to you. Some prefer to give the ‘sit’ command next before you start to walk again.
There is no need to yank the dog back sharply. The collar will hurt the neck and it may yelp, there is no need for this. Now it’s time for the patience to set in. You can give the command to ‘walk’ as you set off again. If the dog starts to pull again you do the same thing. Stop walking immediately.
Your dog will get frustrated of course. It wants to get wherever it’s going and you are not helping. But dogs are not stupid animals, they will soon work out that If they walk in a particular manner then they are going to make some progress on the journey. If it pulls you stop walking and go back to the sit command.
When you come to road junctions then you should always give the command to ‘sit’ and wait until the road is clear. All this is good practice which will educate your dog to be a very responsive animal. Success is not going to happen overnight, but trust me, this is a proven method of success that I am sure will work with you. Failure only comes when the owner feels sorry for the dog and gives it some leeway.
Never forget that you are the master and they look for you for guidance. Just be firm with your verbal commands and actions, be patient and you will get the reward of a dog that you are in complete control of when you walk together.…

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Dogs for Adoption

Raw Bones For Dog Health

Raw bones:

-will keep teeth clean and reduce tartar buildup, therefore great for reducing offensive doggie breath!

-are naturally high in essential fatty acids (EFA’s), fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, K, marrow (blood forming proteins), collagen, minerals (boron, calcium phosphate and phosphorus in the perfect ratio and availability)

-improve skin, coat and general wellbeing of your dog

-beneficial to muscle and bone development as it is an isometric exercise

-dogs can store stress in their jaw, chewing is soothing and serves as a stress release activity as it helps release endorphins which creates a feeling of wellbeing

-chicken bones are high in omega 6, essential acids and raw young bird bones are quite soft

-important for your dogs dental health as bones help prevent periodontal disease, gingivitis, and cavities therefore saving you expensive visits to the vet

-helps strengthen your dogs own bones, teeth and jaw

-will help anal glad problems, so if your dog scoots on grass this could be a sign that including raw bones in his diet would be of benefit

-dogs fed a proportion of raw meat and bone have much smaller, slightly harder and much less smellier stool

-good for dogs that are crated or confined for longer periods of time as it keep them calm and occupied

-ends of bones contain cartilage, great source of glucosamine which has anti inflammatory properties

Suitable bones MUST BE RAW and never cooked as they can splinter internally and cause impaction, also

-discourage your dog from eating old dried out bones

-avoid large marrow type bones as they can wear down teeth enamel and cause cracks

What type of bones to feed?

Always chose an appropriate bone size for your dog. Medium-large dogs: lamb shanks and necks, raw chicken and turkey necks, chicken carcasses and frames, pig’s trotters, beef marrow bones, kangaroo tails. It is always ideal for your dog to chew all bones a few times before swallowing , however if your dog gulps down rather than chewing the bones do not feed lamb shanks).

Smaller dogs, bull terriers, boxers: can be fed raw meaty bones but leave out the larger bones such as lamb shanks. Chicken necks are good for puppies and smaller dogs (or mixed up with other foods for larger dogs who chew well, otherwise they are most likely to be too small and swallowed without chewing. For puppies also try and include bones with some meat as it encourages them to use their front incisor teeth while trying to tear off the meat. This can help prevent further chewing of furniture, shoes it helps the puppy through the teething stage.

Please note that some adult dogs can’t eat any cuts of raw bone perhaps due to the shape of the head of some small breeds, or having an undershot jaw. Older dogs may have lost too many teeth and may be unable to chew bones.

Otherwise, generally feeding your dog raw bones twice weekly is a great start to introducing him to a natural form of food dogs have been accustomed to eating for thousands of years. Dogs are carnivores (meat eaters) so their entire anatomy and physiology is well adapted to digest bones. Their stomach acid is much stronger than humans so they can readily digest bits of bone and chunks of meat. Their strong stomach acid also kills any bacteria or pathogen that would otherwise be harmful to humans. Organic meat and bones are always preferable.

By feeding your dog what dogs would naturally eat in the wild you will be tremendously contributing to his welfare. Why not start by introducing a few different types of bone and create some variety to your dog’s diet this week, observe carefully when he’s eating, and come to your own conclusion!…

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Dog Adoption

Emery Cat Scratcher Files The Cat's Nails Without Harm To You And Your Cat

From the second i found out about the Emery Cat Scratcher I knew that it was manufactured by cat lovers because it features catnip. Cat’s just adore catnip, as a matter of fact my cat Livie has a desire for cat nip. She’ll get in a bed of it and rolls around in the fragrant herb untill she gets all of it over her body. To mention she loves catnip is undoubtedly an understatement.

Due to the catnip, cat adore the emery cat scratcher and often will spend a lot of time scratching there claws, rolling around around the board and just having a good time. The not so good part is that if you’ve multiple cats your going to need the 2nd board mainly because cats don’t share. Don’t even want to think about sharing, it isn’t within there nature.

Spending all of this time on the emery board, your cat’s claws is going to be filed and ideal in a very few weeks doing away with the frustration of cutting their nails. Which is the one job that my cat hated with a passion. One glance at the nail trimmers and she can be gone and not found for the remainder of the day. Using the Emery Cat Scratcher that job is in the past and thankfully forgotten about.

The big downside of the Emery Cat Scratcher is that it is very light and tends to slide around a great deal on solid surfaces. You need to put it to use a rug or carpet therefore it doesn’t travel all over. My cat doesn’t mind a bit , she’ll just travel with the catnip laden board but, you may not want it being underfoot everyday.

I forgot to note above the fact that catnip is only going to work for a couple of months and you might want to replace it. This is a simple task since you can grow your own as I do and easily cut some of the nip and set it on the emery board once or twice on a monthly basis. Or however you can purchase some, it’s available all over in pet stores and do in the same way.

Would I suggest the Emery Cat Scratcher. Yes, and my cat Livie would too. Obviously she would recommend any scenario that included catnip. It take just a couple of minutes to assemble, last for many years and being you can get two of the boards plus a free de-shedder I feel it’s a good bargain.…

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Dog Rescue

Basic Dog Training Tips

Training your dog should be a fun experience where both you and your pet benefit from working together. Unfortunately, too many owners get discouraged in the training process when they fail to make any noticeable progress. This tends to happen when the owner is unprepared from the beginning. In order to help prevent this mistake, here are some basic dog training tips to get you off to a successful start.

Be Patient

It takes time to establish communication channels with your pet. You have to start at the most basic level, assuming your dog knows nothing about what you are doing. This requires a great deal of patience at first, but it is imperative that you display a calm demeanor. Your dog can sense when you are frustrated or upset, and this could intimidate or scare them. Take things slow and know when to stop for the day. This will help insure that your sessions stay fun and productive.

Use Encouragement

Frustration can bring on negative reactions such as scolding or yelling. If you are not careful, then you might find yourself constantly reprimanding your dog throughout the training sessions. This will only confuse your pet and lead to a disinterest in learning. Constant positive reinforcement is the best strategy to creating a constructive learning environment. Make sure to reward your dog for effort, even if he dog doesn?t get a command exactly right.

Repetition is Key

It is understandable to want to move on to the next lesson when your dog performs a command correctly. You are excited about your pet?s progress and you want to keep things moving in the right direction. But the best strategy is to master one task before starting the next one. This is accomplished through repetition exercises, and it is by far the most important step in successful training. Start every new lesson by reviewing previous lessons. Build your dog?s confidence by letting him perform tasks he is familiar with before progressing with new material.

Maintain Structure

Getting your dog into the proper mindset for learning can help improve his retention rate. This can be accomplished by adding consistency and structure to your training sessions. If possible, work with your dog at the same time everyday and keep you?re the sessions under one hour. Start and end each session with a review of tasks they are already familiar with, and try to work on only one new command each time. Familiarity with your training structure will help your dog feel more comfortable. They will know what to expect and they will understand what is expected of them.

There is much more to dog training than just the lessons you teach. There is a psychological element that must also be addressed if you want to save time and frustration. Use the basic dog training tips above to establish the parameters of your training. From there you can concentrate on teaching the actual tasks and commands.…