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Pet Rescue

Owner's Guide to Herpes in Felines

Feline herpes is also known as feline viral rhinotracheitis or FVR for short. The upper respiratory tract is affected by this illness. Caused by the feline herpes virus type 1 (FHV-1), it can affect a cat of any age or breed.

Transmission

Cats infected with this virus shed it in secretions from their mouth, nose, and eyes. These secretions will infect cats who come into contact with them. Cats that come into contact with contaminated food dishes and litter boxes are also at risk. Owners can also harbor the virus on their clothes and hands.

There are also felines who are particularly prone to this type of infection. Those who live in poorly cleaned or ventilated conditions are at risk. Kittens and cats around plenty of other cats are also susceptible. Cats are also at risk when they’re sick from some other diseaes and have a weakened immune system.

Symptoms

As you should already know by now, the upper respiratory tract is affected by this illness. Some of the most common signs include nasal discharge, sneezing, and nasal inflammation. Cats with this condition also routinely develop pink eye, or conjunctivitis. Complications during pregnancy is also a side effect of the herpes virus since it affects the reproductive tract too.

Diagnosis

This virus is pretty simple to diagnose in cats. Your cat’s nasal and eye secretions can be tested in a lab for the virus. The virus can be detected using various tests.

Treatment

Treatment of feline herpes virus mainly consists of supportive care since there is no cure. You will need to ensure that your cat eats and drinks. You will also need to clean any discharge from the eyes and nose. Cats that develop eye inflammation may be given eye drops.

It is also beneficial to minimize the amount of stress that your cat endures while he’s sick. If secondary infections occur, your cat may need to take antibiotics.

Prevention

You should be aware that after a bout with this disease, most cats become latent carriers. Latent carriers show no sign of disease although they are still capable of spreading it via their bodily secretions. Cats can be protected from thsi virus through vaccination.…

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Rescue Dogs

Do You Know The Answer ? Where Do Turtles Live

Though the question, “Where do turtles live?” may seem simple, the answer is quite broad. Turtles live just about everywhere. Depending upon their species, turtles can be found living in a number of habitats.

Where You will Find Sea Turtles – As the name implies, you will find sea turtles living in most of the oceans of the world. The only place you won’t find them is Antarctica. Most sea turtles enjoy the warm, balmy waters of the tropics, but the leatherback sea turtle will roam in colder waters in search of food. All of the sea turtles head for land when it is time to lay their eggs. They will dig a hole in the sand where they deposit their eggs and immediately after covering them up, head back out to sea.

Not much is known about sea turtle habits, but researchers are learning more everyday about these wild creatures that are in so much danger of extinction.

Aquatic Turtle Habitat – Aquatic and semi-aquatic turtles can be found in a wide variety of habitats. Some live in ponds, streams, marshes or swamps. They eat a variety of foods such as fish, plants, mollusks and insects. Some turtles, like the mud turtles, like to burrow in the mud at the bottom of the water source. They can be found in all manner of clean, clear water. They are happiest in a habitat that is chockfull of vegetation and small vertebrates for them to feast upon. You will often see an aquatic turtle at a local lake or pond basking contentedly in the sun on a comfortable rock.

If you intend to purchase an aquatic or semi-aquatic turtle as a pet, you need to do plenty of research so that you may recreate a habitat that will keep your turtle healthy and happy

Land Turtle Habitat – Land turtles can be found in a variety of habitats. Some prefer desert conditions, while others prefer cool mountainous regions. Others will live in pastures and woodlands while others prefer hot and humid habitats. Many land turtles can boast excellent climbing skills and almost all of them love to bask in the sun. Turtles that prefer solid ground to water habitats can be found wherever their food supply takes them.

Keeping a Turtle as a Pet – Many children’s first pet is a turtle. They are fairly inexpensive to keep and live a long life when cared for properly. Providing the right type of habitat for your turtle is one of the most important aspects of successful turtle care. Doing the proper research on the type of turtle you have will afford you much information about the correct diet and living conditions to optimize their captive life. If you are unsure about the right turtle for your household, keep in mind that some turtles live exclusively on land while others will prefer a habitat that allows them to swim freely. Not all turtles spend all of their time beneath the surface, but if they are aquatic or semi-aquatic you will have to ensure they have access to clean, clear water at all times.

Copyright (c) 2008 Steven Magill…

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Rescue Dogs

Owner's Guide to Cat Tapeworms

There are many parasites that can give cats problems. Feline tapeworms are some of the most common. These white worms are capable of growing approximately eight inches long if they live long enough. Thanks to the suckers and hooks that Mother Nature equipped them with, they’re capable of attaching themselves to the walls of the small intestine of your cat.

Cats typically don’t experience many problems if they’re infested with just a few of them. However, tapeworms in cats can cause serious problems as their numbers increase. They will keep your feline from getting the proper nutrition from their food, eventually causing them to shed pounds. Their fur will also undergo changes, becoming rough and dull.

To understand how feline tapeworms infect cats, you first need to understand a bit about their life cycle. As you know, fleas can easily infect your cat. Sometimes, fleas will harbor cysticercoids, which are formed when flea larvae eat tapeworm eggs. If your cat bites at an area infested with infected fleas, he may end up swallowing one.

After eating an infected flea, the small intestine will break it down and leave the cysticercoids to develop into adult cat tapeworms. This is when they will attach themselves to the small intestine walls and sustain themselves with the nutrients that your cat is supposed to get from his food.

Feline tapeworms are segmented. As they grow, segments will break off and pass out of the body through the feces. Owners who inspect their cat’s feces will likely notice them. They look like small grains of rice that are moving around. Some of these segments may also appear around the anus.

Your vet can determine if your cat has tapeworms quite easily. He will simply have to take a look at a sample of your cat’s feces under a microscope. They aren’t always easy to see via the naked eye.

Fortunately, tapeworms in cats are usually easy to deal with. You will need to give your cat dewormer medication in order to get rid of them. One cycle of this medication may not be enough to get rid of the infestation entirely though.

Parasites such as fleas and lice play a vital role in the transmission of feline tapeworms. Therefore, owners need to do their best to control these parasites so that their cat doesn’t get infested with worms. Limiting the amount of time that your cat spends outside roaming around will help. Giving him dewormer medication on a regular basis will also be useful.…

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Pet Rescue

On Safari in Tarangire National Park, Tanzania

I have recently returned from a safari around some of the greatest National Parks and Reserves in the beautiful country of Tanzania. To give you an idea of the kind of animals and scenes I saw in one of my favourite parks there, Tarangire, I have put together a short diary of my day there.
We started our game drive nice and early and proceeded to Tarangire National Park. Spirits were high in our vehicle and we were hopeful to see some great wildlife during our time on safari. Almost instantaneously of arriving within the parks boundaries, we had spotted Zebra and even a herd of elephants taking shelter from the sun under a large Acacia tree. The elephants seemed to be using the tree to scratch themselves, and it was quite interesting to watch.
After a stop to observe the animals and take photographs, we drove on to see a few species of bird of prey, Griffon vultures – which were in a group of around 8 in a dead looking tree (it brought back scenes from the Disney film The Jungle Book!) and a Verreaux’s eagle, which was perched in a tree and later we saw it soaring above the land.
After a quick stop for lunch, we headed down towards a large watering hole, and what we saw next was unbelievable – a pride of lions spread out all around the watering hole, camouflaged into their surroundings and sheltering under trees – all of them had bloody paws, and the evidence of a couple of zebra kills was there in front of us in all its glory details.
There were also a herd of elephants at the watering hole which were having a mud bath and taking turns to throw their baby elephant into the large pool of mud, this was one of the funniest sights I have ever seen, and makes you realise how close elephants are.
Moving on from the watering hole, it was getting late, so was time for us to make moves out of the park. On our way back, we noticed a large crowd of cars pulled up alongside an Acacia tree, we stopped to get a closer look at what was demanding all this attention, and then we saw it – a leopard! The great spotted feline was asleep in the tree, just metres from where we were stopped. After a few minutes it stood up, turned around… and then went back to sleep facing the opposite direction!
On our long drive back to the main gate of the park, we saw plenty more animals, including giraffe, waterbuck and even a pair of Masai ostrich!…

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Pet Adoption

Feline Liver Disease And Feline Diarrhoea Treatment

The Webinar Vet has had a great experience in our first feline series which we held in conjunction with Hills. This was a 200 series of veterinary webinars which thanks to the kind sponsorship of Hills was free to all delegates.

There were several hundred attendees at each webinar. Many different nations were represented on this free online veterinary CPD.

Our first veterinary webinar was with Professor Danielle Gunn-Moore and was concerning feline liver disease. This was a fantastic veterinary webinar which used case material to discuss her approach to the liver patient. Danielle??s enthusiasm is so infectious and we had so many positive comments from the attendees.

The next two veterinary webinars were given by Martha Cannon, a feline specialist based in Oxford. Martha always gives very practical veterinary CPD and these two talks were excellent. In the veterinary webinar on renal disease she discussed the value of diet as well as other treatments. Cats on specialist renal diets will often live twice as long as those fed ordinary diets after diagnosis of chronic renal disease.

In the second veterinary webinar, Martha discussed feline diarrhoea using clinical cases to discuss possible approaches and then in the third veterinary webinar discussed the thorny issue of kidney disease, such a scourge in the cat. The Hills diet k/d is a very important part of treatment in cats suffering from kidney disease as it protects the cat??s kidney and slows progress of the disease. Indeed cats fed on specialist kidney diets will live twice as long as those who are fed ordinary commercial diets.

Norman Johnstone is one of the most famous veterinary dentists in the world. We were honoured to have him on the fourth veterinary webinar in our five veterinary webinar series, free online vet CPD kindly provided by Hills Pet Nutrition. He talked about feline stomatitis and gave some fascinating insights into the treatment of this nasty condition. Interferon seems to be the drug of choice

Finally Duncan Lascelles from North Carolina State University gave an excellent veterinary webinar on feline osteoarthritis. In one study 95%of cats showed radiological signs of osteoarthritis in one or more joints. Cats suffering from osteoarthritis often had a stiff gait and had difficulty jumping. Duncan discussed the various treatments that are available in cats. Often this disease is missed by owners and vats and hence no treatment is prescribed.

This whole series of veterinary webinars, including a bonus talk on feline diabetes is available at and will contribute 6 hours of veterinary CPD to the 35 hours yearly target that all MRCVSs must accomplish to satisfy The Royal College.

This brilliant series of veterinary webinars was brought to you by Hills and The Webinar Vet, a fantastic online resource for vet CPD.…

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Rescue Dogs

Remove Cat Urine Smell And Stains From Your Carpet Quickly And Inexpensively

It can be stressful and time intensive looking for ways on how to get cat urine smell out of carpet. The odor in some homes I’ve been in have literally brought tears to my eyes! Not to mention leaving an ugly stain.

Plus it can be a really big pain requiring you to spend money and buy different cleaning products you do not have any idea if it will work.

After learning what works and what doesn’t from working in my own pet service business for many years, here’s what I do to inexpensively, but successfully, to get rid of cat urine smell plus spots from my personal clients carpet.

It’s so simple and easy and requires just two or three actions to accomplish.

Cleaning Up New Cat Urine Stains Out Of Carpet

Step 1 – For any new stains on your carpet, you first need to absorb as much of the urine as you possibly can using newspapers or paper towels. Press straight down on them to get rid of as much fluid as is possible.

Make sure you position the paper towel or newspaper below the carpeting in the event the urine has soaked into the carpet padding.

Use as much newspapers or paper towels as required so that the stain is hardly damp.

Step 2 – Begin using fresh water to clean the spot. Perform the procedure again till the stains have disappeared. Quick and easy!

Step 3 – (You can use this final step if you would like to be certain all traces of cat urine is gone) – Use an enzyme cleaning agent, which is a product that will literally eat all odor producing bacteria, on the area. This will make certain any cat urine residue still left in the spot is eliminated. In addition, the smell is going to be removed by using this process. You can find and buy an enzyme cleaner at most local stores or on the internet.

Clean-up Those Dried Cat Urine Marks Within Your Carpeting

It will require a bit more work to successfully eliminate older marks which sometimes have set in. You most likely need to get all of them out because your pet companion possess a remarkable sense of smell and might want to go to the bathroom on the same place repeatedly if it can smell its urine there.

Step 1 – Utilizing a carpet cleaning machine, remove any chemical products in addition to cleaners you may have used to remove the stains before on the carpet.

Just use clean water inside the carpet cleaning machine because of the fact that any kind of chemical products can reduce the ability of the enzymatic cleaner (which you’ll use next) at getting rid of the stain.

Avoid the use of too much water on the stain, simply because you do not want to increase the risk of the stain going into the padding beneath the carpeting!

Step 2 – Clean the stain by using an enzymatic product until the stain is no longer visible.

Step 3 – Once the cat urine stains has been visibly removed, utilize a black light flashlight in order to guarantee every last bit of cat urine is fully gone. The black light makes all indications of urine glow a purple color. It’s amazing what this little device can show you that your naked eye cannot see!

If you do discover some traces of urine still left, re-apply the cleaning solution to remove it.

By getting rid of every single cat urine spot, and above all the smells out of the carpet, you’ll considerably lessen the possibility of your cat urinating directly on those same spots for a second time.…

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Rescue Dogs

How To Effectively Treat Mange In Dogs

Dog mange is a condition caused by the Demodex mite that causes irritation to the skin and hair loss. Most cases of mange appear in young dogs. Demodectic mange or Demodicosis is caused by the Demodex mite. The mite can be found in hair follicles. The Demodex mite, in small numbers is normal to be present on the skin of pet. Only when the mite begins to reproduce rapidly it causes the demodectic mange disease also called mange.

Treatment of canine mange

If the disease is temperate usually it heals spontaneously. Statistics show that 90% of demodectic mange cases are localized and can be treated locally. As a local treatment can be diluted Amitraz (3ml to 30 ml of mineral oil), or 1% rotenone ointment (Goodwinol ointment) and applied on the skin daily. In some cases these wounds will heal on their own but they may get worse before they improve. The numbers of mites should be reduced after only four weeks of treatment.

If the number of mites hasn?t reduced, the disease probably should be treated as a generalized form. If a dog develops generalized demodicosis, more aggressive treatment is usually needed. Although treatment is recommended, studies show that 30% to 50 % of generalized cases of mange heal will recover on their own without any treatment.

As a first step in treating the generalized form of mange you should start the treatment with a prescription product called Amitraz (Mitaban-Upjohn). Amitraz dips must be applied every two weeks. Before starting the treatment it is recommended that medium-length and longhaired dogs breeds to be clipped short, so that the solution can get into contact with the skin. First you have to wash the dog entirely with an antibacterial shampoo, like benzoyl peroxide shampoos, and carefully towel dry the dog. Before washing you dog with benzoyl peroxide shampoo you should apply a protective ophthalmic ointment to the eyes of the pet. After drying the dog, apply the Amitraz. Don?t forget to wear protective gloves when applying the Amitraz. Let your pet air-dry after the Amitraz dips. You might also want to administer an antibiotic to control secondary skin infections. This treatment require between 4 and 14 dips given at 2 week intervals. Skin scrapings should be tested for mites after every 4 dips. The treatment should continue until no mites will be found after two consecutive treatments. Dogs with generalized mange can be considered cured only after one year from the last treatment, if no mites we?re found during this period. As side effects to the Amitraz dips, some dogs may feel sedation or nausea.

Some dogs may not respond to this treatment. Although Ivemectin is not licensed for the treatment of demodectic mange, this is used by some veterinarians as treatment for this disease. In some cases, this drug offered good results. Large daily doses of liquid ivermectin must be administered so that the active ingredient should be effective against the Demodex mite. This should only be administered under close veterinary supervision. A second option if Amitraz dips did not work for your dog is Interceptor or Moxidectin. This is may be more effective than Ivemectin. No matter the treatment you choose to treat your dog for mange, you should first speak with a veterinarian.…