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Pet Rescue

Owner's Guide to Herpes in Felines

Feline herpes is also known as feline viral rhinotracheitis or FVR for short. The upper respiratory tract is affected by this illness. Caused by the feline herpes virus type 1 (FHV-1), it can affect a cat of any age or breed.

Transmission

Cats infected with this virus shed it in secretions from their mouth, nose, and eyes. These secretions will infect cats who come into contact with them. Cats that come into contact with contaminated food dishes and litter boxes are also at risk. Owners can also harbor the virus on their clothes and hands.

There are also felines who are particularly prone to this type of infection. Those who live in poorly cleaned or ventilated conditions are at risk. Kittens and cats around plenty of other cats are also susceptible. Cats are also at risk when they’re sick from some other diseaes and have a weakened immune system.

Symptoms

As you should already know by now, the upper respiratory tract is affected by this illness. Some of the most common signs include nasal discharge, sneezing, and nasal inflammation. Cats with this condition also routinely develop pink eye, or conjunctivitis. Complications during pregnancy is also a side effect of the herpes virus since it affects the reproductive tract too.

Diagnosis

This virus is pretty simple to diagnose in cats. Your cat’s nasal and eye secretions can be tested in a lab for the virus. The virus can be detected using various tests.

Treatment

Treatment of feline herpes virus mainly consists of supportive care since there is no cure. You will need to ensure that your cat eats and drinks. You will also need to clean any discharge from the eyes and nose. Cats that develop eye inflammation may be given eye drops.

It is also beneficial to minimize the amount of stress that your cat endures while he’s sick. If secondary infections occur, your cat may need to take antibiotics.

Prevention

You should be aware that after a bout with this disease, most cats become latent carriers. Latent carriers show no sign of disease although they are still capable of spreading it via their bodily secretions. Cats can be protected from thsi virus through vaccination.…

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Pet Rescue

On Safari in Tarangire National Park, Tanzania

I have recently returned from a safari around some of the greatest National Parks and Reserves in the beautiful country of Tanzania. To give you an idea of the kind of animals and scenes I saw in one of my favourite parks there, Tarangire, I have put together a short diary of my day there.
We started our game drive nice and early and proceeded to Tarangire National Park. Spirits were high in our vehicle and we were hopeful to see some great wildlife during our time on safari. Almost instantaneously of arriving within the parks boundaries, we had spotted Zebra and even a herd of elephants taking shelter from the sun under a large Acacia tree. The elephants seemed to be using the tree to scratch themselves, and it was quite interesting to watch.
After a stop to observe the animals and take photographs, we drove on to see a few species of bird of prey, Griffon vultures – which were in a group of around 8 in a dead looking tree (it brought back scenes from the Disney film The Jungle Book!) and a Verreaux’s eagle, which was perched in a tree and later we saw it soaring above the land.
After a quick stop for lunch, we headed down towards a large watering hole, and what we saw next was unbelievable – a pride of lions spread out all around the watering hole, camouflaged into their surroundings and sheltering under trees – all of them had bloody paws, and the evidence of a couple of zebra kills was there in front of us in all its glory details.
There were also a herd of elephants at the watering hole which were having a mud bath and taking turns to throw their baby elephant into the large pool of mud, this was one of the funniest sights I have ever seen, and makes you realise how close elephants are.
Moving on from the watering hole, it was getting late, so was time for us to make moves out of the park. On our way back, we noticed a large crowd of cars pulled up alongside an Acacia tree, we stopped to get a closer look at what was demanding all this attention, and then we saw it – a leopard! The great spotted feline was asleep in the tree, just metres from where we were stopped. After a few minutes it stood up, turned around… and then went back to sleep facing the opposite direction!
On our long drive back to the main gate of the park, we saw plenty more animals, including giraffe, waterbuck and even a pair of Masai ostrich!…

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Pet Rescue

Parvovirus And Your Dog

Parvovirus (commonly called Parvo) is a viral disease that affects dogs. It is far more common in puppies than adult dogs and can have serious ramifications for the infected animal, including death. Parvo grows best in the rapidly dividing cells of the dog?s intestines. As the virus attacks and kills these cells it causes massive diarrhea and halts or slows the creation of white blood cells. In young puppies it can often directly infect the heart, leading to death.

The symptoms of Parvo start with fever, depression, and lethargy. The dog will usually experience a loss of appetite as well and then eventually show more sever signs like vomiting and diarrhea which is often bloody. Once the virus reaches this stage dehydration and death usually follow.

Parvo is carried and transmitted by dogs. The vomit and feces of an infected animal will also carry the virus which is rather resilient and can survive outside the dog?s body in the surrounding environment for as long as nine months. Sometimes an adult dog can be infected by the virus and show no symptoms but act as a carrier transmitting the virus to the other animals it comes into contact with.

There is no cure for Parvo. Dogs that are infected will die of dehydration without treatment. That treatment primarily consists of providing fluids, giving repeated blood transfusions, and preventing dehydration. The mortality rate in dogs affected by Parvo is about 20% if the dog receives treatment in time. Without treatment, about 80% of those infected will die from it. It is a very serious disease.

Parvo tends to affect some dog breeds more than others. Dobermans, Rottweilers, and other black and tan dogs have a greater chance of contracting the virus. The reason for this is unknown but the fact that these dogs are at higher risk does not mean that owners of other types of dogs can rest easily. Dogs of any breed can become infected.

While there is no cure for Parvo, puppies can (and should) be vaccinated against it at an early age. Most vets recommend puppies be immunized starting at six weeks of age with vaccinations continuing until twenty weeks of age. Proper immunization is the best way to prevent a dog from contracting Parvo.…

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Pet Rescue

General Tips About Cats That Will Make You A Pro

No amount of articles can prepare you for raising your first cat! This is a wonderful and exciting experience that you may only have once in life. Make every moment count by having fun with your pet, feeding it delicious food, and keeping it active outside of the home. If this is your first cat, you’ll be glad you took the time to read this article and get prepared.

Make sure to keep your cat’s litter box clean at all times. Most cats do not like to use a dirty litter box, much like you would not want to use a dirty toilet. Scoop it at least once a day. Empty and give it a good cleaning once a week or more if needed.

Check-ups are an absolute must for any pet cat. Cats need to get shots so they don’t get sick and a vet can help you make sure your cat is okay. For the most consistent pet care, choose one veterinarian and stick with them. Your veterinarian needs to know about your pet’s history, and your cat will feel more comfortable if you always take her to the same vet.

If your cat is female, then ensure you spay her as soon as you can. If an indoor cat gets out, you may soon have kittens. Your best bet is to have your female cat spayed.

Play with your cat using proper cat toys. Cats love toys that help them feel like the predators that they think they are. Try sticking with toys that help them dance around or jump. This can also help them use extra energy by pouncing on toys instead of people’s feet.

Check your cats ears frequently for ear mites. You may notice your cat shaking their head or scratching their ears a lot if they have them. They are tiny parasites that look like coffee grounds in your cat’s ears. If you have more than one cat, they can also travel from cat to cat. See a vet before using any medication on them since their ears need properly cleaned first.

Do not flush clumpable litter in your toilet. This can lead to problems with your plumbing. Instead just lift the clumps and dispose of them in a trash bag. Don’t forget, moisture is what makes the litter clump in the first place! Avoid doing that to your pipes and just dispose of it properly.

Should you leave the house with your cat, make sure that she is wearing a collar with tags. This way, if anything happens and you two become separated, anyone can find her and know how to reach you. Your cat may not like the collar all the time, but when she’s out of the house it can save her.

Pet

Be sure to have your pet cat spayed or neutered by the time it is six months old. A spayed or neutered cat is a more satisfactory pet because it is calmer, quieter and more likely to stay home. Neutered male cats do not spray urine to mark their territory. This is definitely a plus when it comes to cat ownership.

Have your cat spayed or neutered. Pet overpopulation is a growing problem, with millions of homeless cats and kittens euthanized every year. Besides the problem of too many kittens and not enough homes, unfixed cats can have a multitude of behavior problems. Males who are not neutered at a young age often start spraying to mark their territory, and females who are allowed to come into heat yowl incessantly as they try to escape to find a mate. Kittens can begin to breed as early as 4 months of age, so get your new kitten spayed or neutered as soon as possible.

Pet Adoption

If you are looking for a new home for your kitty, consider registering with an online pet adoption agency. Some of these companies screen applicants, so you will be sure that your pet is going into a good home. This is better than selling him to a creep who lurks around Craigslist all the time.

Your first cat is a special pet that should remain in your memories as a great time spent raising an adorable animal. Future pets will get easier to train and feed, but cats will always be a complex, confusing, messy animal. Small changes here and there help make this a unique experience.…