The Proper Techniques For Hound Training

Hound training will be differentiated based on what you intend to do with your new arrival, but there are a basic few principals which must always remain the same. Physical punishments are never a good way to go, and these should be avoided when training any puppy or dog. Instilling fear, confusion, and mistrust by lashing out at your helpless animal isn’t good for either of you, so if you find that you are not patient or calm enough to take on the responsibility of properly and safely raising a secure, well behaved, and happy dog who is eager and willing to please you, you may want to consider handing him over to someone more qualified before permanent damage is done to the dog. That said, we can begin to walk through a few steps that are common in hound training.
If your hounds are to be home and family dogs, this is fine, but you must understand the pure and strong instincts that will pull at him when neither of you expect it. He must never be punished or faulted for chasing small game or for setting out on a hot trail. This is his job, predetermined by hundreds of years worth of sound breeding, and no amount of couch potato domestication will change this. What you can do is to give him plenty of stimulation along the lines of chase games and interesting toys during and after hound training, and be sure that he has a completely secure yard to play in before you even consider bringing him home. It will be your job to keep him safe; remembering that a hunting hound dog set loose in the city could end up in a very tragic situation.
Hound training will also involve a very clean and clear outlining of and adhering to the rules of roost, which you control at all times with no exceptions. There should be one precise word for each command, place, or object that you want him to learn, and you should use these words often, but only when they pertain to what you wish him to do. A dog’s life can be utterly confusing, especially when all he wants to do is to please you. Make it easy on both of you, and start teaching him your key words right away. Getting off of furniture should be met with “off”, laying down should be “down”, going outside shout be “out” or “outside”, but be sure to pick just one and stick with it. This word association when learned early can mean the difference between a safe, healthy, and happy hound dog or a confused, depressed, nervous wreck of a hound who has given up trying to do the right thing.

See also  Basic Dog Training Tips